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5 Easy Ways To Relieve Lower Back Pain

If sometime over this past week you have experienced lower back pain, you are not alone. Most people experience back pain at least once in their lifetime. In most cases, lower back pain is mild and will go away on its own with proper care.Lower back pain usually occur due to overuse, strain or injury. It could also be caused by too much bending, twisting, lifting or even from sitting too much.

Here are some tips for lower back pain relief:

1. Stay active

One of the most common recommended treatments for back pain is bed rest. Is this a truth or myth? Recent research from the American College of Sport Medicine found that people who continue their activities without bed rest recover faster than those who have bed rest after a back injury.   So, don’t stop moving because staying active is very important.  Do as much of your normal routine as possible but avoid heavy lifting and bending.

 

2. Good sitting posture and alignment

Prolonged sitting with a forward-curved back is the most common reason of back and neck pain.  When it comes to sitting postures, your mom knows best, doesn’t she?  Research  shows that sitting upright will actually strain your back over time and leaning back about 135 degrees while you are sitting is actually better for your lower back.  Choose a chair that allows you to rest both feet flat on the floor while keeping your knees level with your hips.  If the chair doesn’t support your lower back’s curve, place a rolled towel or small pillow behind your lower back.  Generally, the best posture is to have different postures.   Remember to stand up and stretch a little for every 20-25 minutes of sitting to prevent having a stiff back.

 

3. Heat and cold pack

Besides taking anti-inflammatory medications, heat and ice treatment are basic home remedies for sudden flare-ups of lower back pain.  If you have strained your back from lifting  heavy luggage or gardening, apply ice packs to the affected area for 15-20 minutes about 3 to 4 times a day for the first 48 to 72 hours after a back sprain to reduce inflammation.  After the first 48-72 hours, you may apply moist heat to the affected area as it relieves pain and makes you more comfortable.

 

4.Home care for your back

It is not recommended that you engage in strenuous exercises for the first couple of days after a back injury.  When the pain has subsided or stopped, exercise will be the cornerstone for the treatment program.  Begin with light aerobic training.  Walking, riding a stationary bicycle and swimming are great examples of low-impact exercises that you can start with. These aerobic activities can improve blood flow to your back and promote healing.  They also strengthen muscles in your stomach and back.  Stretching and strengthening exercises are important for the long-term care of your back.  However, starting these exercises too soon after an injury can worsen your pain. A physical therapist can help you to estimate when to begin stretching and strengthening exercises and how to do them.

 

5. Stop stressing out!

Have you heard of tension myositis syndrome?  It’s a kind of disorder in which emotional stress maybe the reason of your lower back pain.  Regardless of whether this is true or not, it is generally accepted that our body is connected to our mind and chronic stress will affect our physical health.  So, try to figure out what is the cause of your stress and find a healthy way to manage and cope with it.

Not all lower back pain is the same, so treatment will be different for different symptoms and conditions.  Lower back pain that persists for more than 3 months is considered chronic.  If your lower back pain doesn’t go away or is getting worse after 3 days, you should see a doctor for advice.

 

Sources:

ACSM’S Health & Fitness Journal: March/April 2013 – Volume 17 – Issue 2 – p 5

http://www.acatoday.org/content_css.cfm?CID=3124

http://www.coreperformance.com/knowledge/injury-pain/back-pain.html

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/back-pain/HQ00955/NSECTIONGROUP=2

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/backpain/detail_backpain.htm#211673102

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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